Fresh fruit doesn't have a long shelf life, but with proper storage, you can keep it from going bad too soon. Avoid washing the fruits until just before you plan to use them; the moistness can encourage mold growth and rot. If fruit starts to get too ripe, consider freezing it. Berries, cherries, bananas and other fruits can be frozen for up to a year. But your best bet is to prevent over-ripening in the first place

Here's how to keep fruit fresh:

Fruit: apples
How to store: in plastic bag in fridge
Lasts up to: 6 weeks

Fruit: apricots
How to store: in paper bag at room temperature to ripen; then in fridge
Lasts up to: 1 week in fridge

Fruit: bananas
How to store: hang on banana hanger in coolest part of kitchen 
Lasts up to: 1 week

Fruit: berries
How to store: put in glass bowl lined with paper towels in fridge
Lasts up to: 4 days

Fruit: cherries
How to store: place in covered container in fridge 
Lasts up to: 2 weeks

Fruit: citrus
How to store: in fridge 
Lasts up to: 2 weeks

Fruit: kiwi
How to store: store at room temperature until ripe; then in fridge 
Lasts up to: 3 weeks

Fruit: mangos
How to store: store at room temperature until ripe; then in fridge's crisper
Lasts up to: 4 days in fridge

Fruit: melons
How to store: in fridge away from vegetables 
Lasts up to: 4 days

Fruit: nectarines
How to store: in paper bag at room temperature until ripe; then in fridge
Lasts up to: 1 week

Fruit: peaches
How to store: in paper bag at room temperature until ripe, thin in fridge
Lasts up to: 1 week

Fruit: pomegranates
How to store: in fridge 
Lasts up to: 2 months

These fruits are picked at ripening, so don’t expect them to get juicier or sweeter after you bring them home: berries, cherries, citrus, grapes, pineapple, watermelon

These fruits are picked before ripening, and will get juicier in your kitchen: Apricots, blueberries, figs, melons (except watermelon), nectarines, passionfruit, peaches, persimmons

These fruits should get sweeter when you bring them home: apples, kiwi, mangos, papayas, pears