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Oxycodone with ibuprofen

 

Drug Class:

Analgesics (Opioid)

Brand Names

Combunox


Dosages

Help

In combination pill, 5 mg oxycodone and 400 mg ibuprofen every 6 hours as needed.

 


Potential Side Effects

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Constipation; dizziness; drowsiness; dry mouth; headache; increased sweating; itching of skin; nausea; shortness of breath; vomiting; weakness.

 


Special Instructions

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  • Do not take with aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
  • Do not increase the dose on your own or stop treatment abruptly unless told to do so by a doctor. Do not drive, operate machinery or perform other potentially dangerous activities until you know whether the medication will affect your ability to do them safely.
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Be Aware

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  • This medicine contains ibuprofen, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID). Before taking any type of NSAID, tell your doctor if you drink alcohol or take blood thinners (including warfarin), ACE inhibitors, lithium or furosemide. Also report any sensitivity or allergy to aspirin or similar drugs. All NSAIDs may cause an increased risk of serious blood clots, heart attacks and stroke, which can be fatal. This risk may increase with dose and duration of use. Patients who have or who are at risk for cardiovascular disease may be at greater risk for these complications. NSAIDs should not be used for pain if you are going to have coronary bypass surgery. Do not take NSAIDs late in pregnancy.
  • Opioids can slow breathing and suppress the cough reflex. Before taking an opioid, tell your doctor if you have a history of lung disease or breathing difficulties. Taking opioids with certain other drugs can increase the risk of dangerous side effects. Especially tell your doctor if you take antihistamines (allergy medications), tranquilizers, sleeping pills, muscle relaxants or other pain medication, or if you have a history of alcohol or drug abuse.
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The Arthritis Today Drug Guide is meant for education – not self-medicating. Arthritis Today, the Arthritis Foundation and the Drug Guide Medical Review Panel do not endorse any products mentioned in this guide. While we endeavor to keep the information up to date, we make no representations or warranties about the completeness of the information provided.

About Arthritis Today Drug Guide | Privacy Policy | Medical Review Panel

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